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Mozart's Journey to Prague (Penguin Classics)

Mozart's Journey to Prague (Penguin Classics) - Eduard Friedrich Mrike Mozart's Journey to Prague disappointed me on two counts: 1) Mozart, and 2) Prague. PragueThe cover of the Penguin Classics edition is adorned with Mozart's Journey to Prague written in large script, and a beautiful image of the Prague skyline. For all that, Prague appears in exactly 0% of the book. I don't think the word "Prague" is ever even mentioned.MozartThis is a short fictional story about Mozart and his wife attending a wedding where all the guests kiss his ass because he's such a celebrity. Maybe that could be made interesting, if Mozart were an engaging character. But he isn't. In the movie "Amadaeus", he's an unpretentious, fun-loving genius, and a bit of a renagade. In this book, he's an idiot-savant with a flat affect. One scene has him standing entirely too long under a tree in a sort of autistic stupor, transfixed by the appearance of an orange hanging from one of the branches. Later, in a numbing eight page soliloquy, Mrs. Mozart describes how her husband falsely believed for YEARS that his home had a garden. He even bought his wife gardening tools, which she graciously accepted, without clarifying the truth. Only in the very last ten pages is the reader treated to a glimpse of Mozart's genius, as he is writing his opera Don Giovanni. Then, out of the blue, in the final scene, the bride from the aforementioned wedding has a premonition that Mozart will die at a young age. WTF? Finishing on that note, I kind of expected Alan Funt to emerge from a corner and explain to me that the whole book was a gag for "Candid Camera". (kids: substitute "Ashton Kutcher" and "Punk'd" if you don't know what I'm talking about)Adding to my perplexity is the foreword by Penguin Books, which explains that this is one of two books written by Eduard Friedrich Mörike, and of the two, Mozart's Journey to Prague is by far considered his masterpiece! Apparently the work was so popular, Mörike eventually withdrew from public life and became something of a hermit to avoid the chaos of celebrity life. (I'm trying to picture Mörike ducking out the back door of a restaurant to escape hundreds of screaming fans, like the Beatles being rushed into a limousine after a concert!) What did all those people see that I didn't see?